Articles  |   September 2015
Change Management and the Perioperative Surgical Home
Article Information
Practice Management / Articles
Articles   |   September 2015
Change Management and the Perioperative Surgical Home
ASA Monitor 09 2015, Vol.79, 30-32.
ASA Monitor 09 2015, Vol.79, 30-32.
Leslie M. Garson M.D., M.I.H.M., is Associate Clinical Professor, Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care, UC Irvine Health Center, Orange, California.

  Leslie M. Garson M.D., M.I.H.M., is Associate Clinical Professor, Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care, UC Irvine Health Center, Orange, California.

Shermeen B. Vakharia, M.D., is Clinical Professor and Vice Chair for Quality and Patient Safety, Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care, University of California, Irvine School of Medicine, Orange, California.

  Shermeen B. Vakharia, M.D., is Clinical Professor and Vice Chair for Quality and Patient Safety, Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care, University of California, Irvine School of Medicine, Orange, California.

Zeev N. Kain, M.D., M.B.A., is Chancellor’s Professor of Anesthesiology and Pediatrics and Psychiatry, and Chair, Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care, University of California, Irvine.

  Zeev N. Kain, M.D., M.B.A., is Chancellor’s Professor of Anesthesiology and Pediatrics and Psychiatry, and Chair, Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care, University of California, Irvine.

The Perioperative Surgical Home (PSH) model – to reiterate what has been the defining lexicon in the anesthesia world for the past two years – is a patient-centered, physician-led multidisciplinary and team-based system of coordinated care for the surgical patient. This is a model of care that provides for the patient a perioperative experience that is continuous, seamless, without silos, efficient and intuitive. By intuitive, we mean from the patients’ perspective. As patients, it would seem only natural that everybody on the team would know what the other individuals are doing. It would be obvious that information about the patient gathered in the preoperative phase would be communicated to the intraoperative team and postoperative team. Those events occurring during surgery would be appropriately communicated to the team managing the patient postoperatively. And, of course, once the patient left the hospital, all the information and events of the hospital course would be communicated with that patient’s primary care physician and other providers, if appropriate. However, we on the other side of the veil know differently. We understand, and have come to expect, silos of care, discontinuity of communication, and fragmented and variable processes. In fact, one could argue, as physicians and clinical providers, this way of practicing and caring for patients is “in our DNA.” It is how we were trained and have practiced for years.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment

Contributors must reveal any conflict of interest. Comments are moderated.

Name
Affiliation & Institution
I have a potential conflict of interest
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
ASA Member Login or Create an Account ×