Features  |   May 2015
Multitasking, Distraction and Cognitive Aids
Author Affiliations
  • Brett L. Arron, M.D.
    Committee on Patient Safety and Education
  • Sara E. Neves, M.D.
    Committee on Patient Safety and Education
  • Roy G. Soto, M.D.
    Committee on Patient Safety and Education
Article Information
Cardiovascular Anesthesia / Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems / Obstetric Anesthesia / Patient Safety / Pediatric Anesthesia / Respiratory System / Technology / Equipment / Monitoring / Quality Improvement / Features
Features   |   May 2015
Multitasking, Distraction and Cognitive Aids
ASA Monitor 05 2015, Vol.79, 30-32.
ASA Monitor 05 2015, Vol.79, 30-32.
Multitasking – concurrent task management – is a very common yet complicated cognitive activity. Physician anesthesiologists multitask in complex, intermittently high-workload environments. We scan monitors sequentially and decide on and administer medications while monitoring fluid administration in parallel. Tasks may be delayed by competing demands, which then require prospective memory to recall them back to consciousness. When we are taken out of our routines, prospective memory failures become more common. The failure to complete one or several of numerous tasks (e.g., pre-induction heparin SQ, pre-incision antibiotics, etc.) is to be expected. When engaging prospective memory, there can be a delay or “recovery time” as our minds reconstruct previous sequences of events to identify which tasks were delayed.1  System Safety is an engineering system approach used to anticipate, manage and prevent a wide range of expected task failures.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment

Contributors must reveal any conflict of interest. Comments are moderated.

Name
Affiliation & Institution
I have a potential conflict of interest
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
ASA Member Login or Create an Account ×