Features  |   September 2013
Educating Physician Anesthesiologists to Better Manage Patients with a Difficult Airway
Article Information
Airway Management / Features
Features   |   September 2013
Educating Physician Anesthesiologists to Better Manage Patients with a Difficult Airway
ASA Monitor 09 2013, Vol.77, 18-19.
ASA Monitor 09 2013, Vol.77, 18-19.
Maintaining patient oxygenation and ventilation are among the highest priority tasks for a physician anesthesiologist. During the past 20 years, because the prevalence of severe obesity and obstructive sleep apnea have more than doubled in the United States, a large proportion of our patients are at risk for difficult laryngoscopy, difficult ventilation or aspiration of gastric contents. During the same time period, supraglottic airways and video-assisted airway devices have been introduced and now assume a prominent place in the ASA Difficult Airway Algorithm.1,2  Studies using large databases have been published that offer insight into the risk factors for a difficult airway, modes of injury and clinicians’ responses to challenging airway situations.3,4  The confluence of these events gives physician anesthesiologists opportunities to improve care but also demands that we revise training curricula and re-educate ourselves to assimilate new technologies, techniques and information into our care models.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment

Contributors must reveal any conflict of interest. Comments are moderated.

Name
Affiliation & Institution
I have a potential conflict of interest
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
ASA Member Login or Create an Account ×