Features  |   August 2013
The Obese Patient For Ambulatory Surgery: Where Do We Draw the Line?
Author Affiliations
  • Girish P. Joshi, M.D., M.B.B.S., FFARCSI
    Committee on Ambulatory Surgical Care
Article Information
Ambulatory Anesthesia / Endocrine and Metabolic Systems / Features
Features   |   August 2013
The Obese Patient For Ambulatory Surgery: Where Do We Draw the Line?
ASA Monitor 08 2013, Vol.77, 18-20.
ASA Monitor 08 2013, Vol.77, 18-20.
The prevalence of obesity is rapidly increasing worldwide. Pathophysiological changes associated with obesity influence multiple organs and increase the risk of comorbidities.1 -4  Therefore, this patient population may be at a higher risk of perioperative morbidity. Nevertheless, it is generally recommended that body weight or body mass index (BMI) alone should not be used as the sole indicator of suitability for surgery or its location.5  Most anesthesiologists use a body weight or BMI “cut off” in their ambulatory anesthesia practice, which has gradually increased over the years. So what is the current evidence assessing the appropriate selection of obese patients scheduled for ambulatory surgery?
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